Scientists digitally reconstructed a dinosaur’s brain; here’s what they found

Provided by: Lifestyle Desk | New Delhi |

15 December 2020 20:50:12





The report also states that although the dinosaur fossils were discovered in the 1800s, it is only recently that they can be studied without being destroyed. (File)

Scientists digitally reconstructed a dinosaur’s brain, which gave them a rare insight into its behavioral patterns and diet.

According to a CNN report, citing a study published in the Linnean Society’s Zoological Journal, researchers from the University of Bristol have reconstructed the brain of a Thecodontosaurus, a sauropod, believed to have been sighted in England around 205 million years ago. . The results revealed that Thecodontosaurus’ diet may have been meat based and that they walked using two legs.

“Our analysis of the Thecodontosaurus brain uncovered many fascinating features, some of them quite surprising. While its later relatives moved heavily on all fours, our findings suggest that this species may have walked on two legs and was occasionally carnivorous, “said lead author Antonio Ballell. The study also stated that Thecodontosaurus it was shaped like a large dog.

The report also states that although the dinosaur fossils were discovered in the 1800s, it is only recently that they can be studied without being destroyed. “Although the actual brain has long since disappeared, the software allows us to recreate the shape of the brain and inner ear through the size of the cavities left behind,” Ballell added. “The skull of Thecodontosaurus is well preserved, so we compared it to other dinosaurs, identifying common and some specific features of Thecodontosaurus,” Ballell continued.

The creature’s skull, as discovered by the researchers, revealed large floccular lobes. They help balance themselves, also indicating that they moved on two feet. “This structure is also associated with the control of balance and eye and neck movements, suggesting that Thecodontosaurus was relatively agile and could maintain a steady gaze while moving fast,” Ballell said. New technologies have contributed to the creation of 3D models of both the skull and the endocast.

“Our analysis showed parts of the brain associated with maintaining head stability, and the steady eyes and gaze during movement were well developed. This could also mean Thecodontosaurus may occasionally capture prey, although its tooth morphology suggests plants were the main component of its diet. It is possible that he has adopted omnivorous habits, “he was further cited.

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